Johari's Window

Explorations of self and world through art, love, and adventure.

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8:15 PM
May 25th, 2012
bookmania:

from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll


bookmania:

from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

5:35 PM
April 29th, 2012
I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (via bookmania)
5:34 PM
April 29th, 2012
Letter: Classic Advice for a Bacchanal

archaeology:

By Dan Curley, Classics Department Associate Professor and Chai, Skidmore College

Some excerpts:

(1) The Greeks did not wear togas, especially not Greek gods. You’re thinking of the Romans. Please do not ever associate “Greeks” and “togas” again. If, however, you want to advertise your party with the catchphrase, “We put the TOGA in Saratoga,” go ahead. You’re welcome.

(2) The word “Bacchanal” is, ultimately, a Latin word, derived from the name of the god Bacchus. Bacchus, as you seem to be aware, was the god of wine and of partying in general. (Though there is more to him than that.) However, since he’s more famous as a Roman god, it’s very unlikely that Greek gods would show up to his party. Hence, please encourage your attendees to unleash their inner Venus (the Roman Aphrodite) instead — if she must be unleashed in public and all that.

(3) Apollo is an exception to this rule, since Apollo’s Roman name is also Apollo. So encouraging folks to unleash their inner Apollo at a Bacchanal is fine — provided that you remember he is a god of enlightenment rather than drunken revelry. In fact, he’s usually so busy providing oracles, making prophecies, and healing the sick, that I doubt he has time for too many parties. Hence, unleashing one’s inner Apollo at a Bacchanal might not be the thing, unless you’re looking to end the party. That bright orb that stings your eyes the morning after and calls you back to reason? THAT’S Apollo. Invite him at your own risk.

(3a) Also, the laurel wreath is Apollo’s emblem. Hence, when you urge your prospective audience to “think laurel wreaths,” you are in fact inviting them to behave like Apollo. (See my remarks under number 3, above.) Please encourage them to “think ivy wreaths” instead: ivy is Bacchus’ plant.

(5) Thank you in advance for not using Greek sigmas (our s-equivalent) as the letter E to make things look more Greeky and stuff. You know: GRΣΣKY. Don’t do that. (You didn’t.) It is rumored that such offenses against the language will cause Alexander the Great to rise from the dead and take names. That wouldn’t be so bad — especially if he came looking like Colin Farrell or even Richard Burton — but (pro tip) you really don’t want to hedge your bets when Alex is in one of his moods. For instruction in the proper usage of Greek letters, I invite everyone to take CG 110: Elementary Greek this fall.

5:26 PM
April 29th, 2012

Something E.B. White Said

mentalflossr:

“In real life, a spider doesn’t spin words in her web. In real life, a swan doesn’t blow a trumpet. But real life is only one kind of life—there is also the life of the imagination.”

5:21 PM
April 29th, 2012
menandtheirdogs:

2  and 2


menandtheirdogs:

2  and 2

5:19 PM
April 29th, 2012
archaeology:

Jeremy Deller’s inflatable Stonehenge gives Glasgow a bounce in its step
The Turner prize winner’s bouncy new interactive artwork, Sacrilege, kicks off the Glasgow international festival of visual art.
More here.


archaeology:

Jeremy Deller’s inflatable Stonehenge gives Glasgow a bounce in its step

The Turner prize winner’s bouncy new interactive artwork, Sacrilege, kicks off the Glasgow international festival of visual art.

More here.

5:17 PM
April 29th, 2012
theanimalblog:

Captain Owen Beynon Brown from the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery holds his dog Lord Percy, a resident at the barracks up for Tango his horse to greet, at Wellington Barracks in London, Thursday, April 19, 2012.  (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)


theanimalblog:

Captain Owen Beynon Brown from the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery holds his dog Lord Percy, a resident at the barracks up for Tango his horse to greet, at Wellington Barracks in London, Thursday, April 19, 2012.  (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

(via menandtheirdogs)

1:50 PM
August 28th, 2011
thefabulousthomasj:

:’)

 AWWWW!


thefabulousthomasj:

:’)

 AWWWW!

(Source: solid-killl, via menandtheirdogs)

9:36 AM
August 26th, 2011
bookmania:

Happy start of term, Hogwarts students. (via presidents)

 Back to school soon…why can’t it be Hogwarts?


bookmania:

Happy start of term, Hogwarts students. (via presidents)

 Back to school soon…why can’t it be Hogwarts?

8:06 PM
August 20th, 2011
My life. Oi.
guysanddogs:

Tom Hardy.


My life. Oi.

guysanddogs:

Tom Hardy.

(via menandtheirdogs)

2:02 PM
August 11th, 2011

Seeing Things at FACE Value

"You know that woman who got attacked by that ape?"

I nod politely, mentally going through what I knew about primate attacks. At the same time, I glance down at the pile of library books she’d just checked out for me. Is there any book in there that could have triggered this question?

"Well, she was on the Today show - not her I mean, but her brother, and they showed her in the hospital bed…"

Ah. I don’t watch the news, but this chick is obviously dying to discuss this story with someone. I try to look attentive, at the same planning to escape with an “How interesting - but I’ve got to go!” at the first sign of a pause. This woman is a stranger to me and yet is chatting me up like nobody’s business.

"You know how that ape ripped her face off? She’s gotten a face transplant! They’re doing her hands too. They did them actually, but she got pneumonia and they had to take them off again. When she’s better, she’ll try again for the hands…"

Visions of a bloody, faceless, handless woman fill my mind’s eye. Oh dear. Still, maybe she has a point to this story? A reason for bringing it up after saying less than five words to me while beeping books into the computer? Anyway she shows no sign of stopping…

"Imagine! People don’t think about that when they donate organs, do they? When my husband died, they took his heart’s valves and froze them. They freeze them for the babies; if a baby needs some, they don’t have time to wait. So they froze his heart valves…"

Heart valves. Frozen heart valves. I wonder if they look like violet tubular popsicles and nearly gag. I murmur something about how nice it was for her husband to donate his heart valves to the little ones. When I shift the weight of my left foot to move toward the door, she fixes me with a manic, glazed-over look. And keeps going.

"They wouldn’t take his eyes though. I’m still upset about that. They wouldn’t take his eyes. When you wear contact lenses, they don’t take your eyes. They’re not ’virgin eyes,’ you see."

At this point in the rant, I have begun to feel like the target of an organ donation campaign. I sense that she is advising me to donate not only my heart and others in the event of my untimely demise, but also to donate parts of my face. I wear contacts, so my eyes are safe…but “they can use other parts of a person’s face.” Argh. Gurgle. I curb the desire to bolt out too quickly. Luckily she was ending her tirade and took a breath. Her last words to me on my way out the door?

"Have a good day and good luck in school."

Good grief. You’ve just unknowingly put me off donating my organs, and you’re wishing me good luck? ”They” can have my heart, mind, but NO ONE is going about with MY FACE after I’m cold in the ground.

Strangers talk to me. I guess I just have that kind of face. But this goes on record as the weirdest, most disturbing incident yet. Face the facts: life is unpredictable.

Cheers.

11:02 AM
August 11th, 2011
maxshimasu-luminous-creatures:

Hugh Laurie
HUG LAURIE AND A PUG! AHHHH! SO CUTE!


maxshimasu-luminous-creatures:

Hugh Laurie

HUG LAURIE AND A PUG! AHHHH! SO CUTE!

(via menandtheirdogs)

10:59 AM
August 11th, 2011
I love it. Reading to Sam always makes me feel fantastic - why shouldn’t little ones benefit from reading to pups?
zoo-logic:

Reading the dog a bedtime story may not be such a silly idea after all. A recent study, conducted through the school summer holidays of 2010, got second-grade students of varying abilities to read aloud to either dogs or people for thirty minutes once a week. The research produced some surprising results. Those children who had read to people actually displayed a slight decline in reading ability, as well as in their attitude towards reading, whereas - remarkably - those who read to dogs showed an increase in both of these measures. In addition, of the nine students assigned to read to people, a third dropped out of the study before completion. No children left the dog group. Though the results were small and not statistically significant in the case of this experiment, the study has opened up an area for further research on the therapeutic impacts of reading with dogs. The findings so far suggest nevertheless that reading with dogs could help to prevent skills from dropping over the course of the summer holidays and encourage a positive attitude towards reading which is so important in learning.(This research isn’t truly zoology-related, but I just thought the idea of kids reading to dogs was really adorable!)Ref: Lenihan et al. (2011) Benefits of Reading Assistance Dogs. Tufts University [link]


I love it. Reading to Sam always makes me feel fantastic - why shouldn’t little ones benefit from reading to pups?

zoo-logic:

Reading the dog a bedtime story may not be such a silly idea after all. A recent study, conducted through the school summer holidays of 2010, got second-grade students of varying abilities to read aloud to either dogs or people for thirty minutes once a week. The research produced some surprising results. Those children who had read to people actually displayed a slight decline in reading ability, as well as in their attitude towards reading, whereas - remarkably - those who read to dogs showed an increase in both of these measures. In addition, of the nine students assigned to read to people, a third dropped out of the study before completion. No children left the dog group. Though the results were small and not statistically significant in the case of this experiment, the study has opened up an area for further research on the therapeutic impacts of reading with dogs. The findings so far suggest nevertheless that reading with dogs could help to prevent skills from dropping over the course of the summer holidays and encourage a positive attitude towards reading which is so important in learning.

(This research isn’t truly zoology-related, but I just thought the idea of kids reading to dogs was really adorable!)

Ref: Lenihan et al. (2011) Benefits of Reading Assistance Dogs. Tufts University [link]